Supplemental #02 – Djinn

djinn_raging

I tried to squeeze the whole subject of Jinn into Aladdin Part 2, but to do so would kill the momentum of the Aladdin story, so I decided this should be another supplemental. And since you all like the first supplemental about Shahadazad so much, supplemental episodes may become a regular thing.


When you do a little research about Jinn, one thing you may find interesting is that people in the Middle East, and in the west have encountered a species of intelligent beings. They can change their shapes, can fly through the air and can even render themselves invisible. They watch us, study us and react to us. Occasionally they abduct people for purposes we can only speculate about.

Recommended Reading

 

download

Legends of the Fire Spirits: Jinn and Genies from Arabia to Zanzibar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

arabian-nights-1
The Arabian Nights: Tales of 1,001 Nights: Volume 1 

 

arabian-nights-2
The Arabian Nights: Tales of 1,001 Nights: Volume 2 (Penguin Classics)

arabian-nights-3

The Arabian Nights: Tales of 1,001 Nights: Volume 3 (Penguin Classics)

 

 

Bibliography

Print

Lebling, Robert; “Legends of the Fire Spirits: Jinn and Genies from Arabia to Zanzibar” Counterpoint (March 8, 2011)

Lyons, Malcom; Lyons, Ursula “Art of Mulan, “The Arabian Nights: Tales of 1,001 Nights: Volume 1″ Penguin Classics (February 4, 2010)

Lyons, Malcom; Lyons, Ursula “Art of Mulan, “The Arabian Nights: Tales of 1,001 Nights: Volume 2″ Penguin Classics (February 4, 2010)

Lyons, Malcom; Lyons, Ursula “Art of Mulan, “The Arabian Nights: Tales of 1,001 Nights: Volume 3″ Penguin Classics (February 4, 2010)

 

Film

“Aladdin” Dir. Ron Clemens, John Musker, Buena Vista Pictures 1992

“The Thief of Baghdad” , Dir. Ludwig Berger, Michael Powell, Tim Whelan, United Artists, 1940

 

World Wide Web

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scheherazade – Scheherazade

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_Thousand_and_One_Nights – One Thousand and One Nights

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_carpet

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thief_and_the_Cobbler

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aladdin

http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/Aladdin

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oriental_studies

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antoine_Galland

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scheherazade

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_Thousand_and_One_Nights

Comments

  1. If you are as interested int the djinn as you sound I recommend this book, The Djinn Connection: The Hidden Links Between Djinn, Shadow People, ETs, Nephilim, Archons, Reptilians and Other Entities
    By. Rosemary Ellen Guiley

    I heard about Djinn the first time this past December when the other of this book was on The Paranormal Podcast hosted by Jim Harold. It was so interesting to listen to and the thought that what we call shadow people in the west are actually Djinn, not sure it accounts for all entities but some. Loved the supplemental found it very interesting, and thought you may enjoy this as well. Keep up the great work

  2. John Cole says:

    I’m sure you’ve probably ran across the Bartimaeus stories before, but if not they are a series of books by Jonathan Stroud. His stories line up well with your descriptions of djinn and other related entities. Figured I’d mention them to you, in case you hadn’t seen them.

    Thanks for the great research, I really enjoy this series, and appreciate the amount of effort you are putting in!

    John

  3. Hey!!!
    Loved this and the Aladdin 5b episode but I have 1 question.
    Why did Disney call the Genie, Genie rather than Djinn and do Djinn’s have names and if so why not give Genie a name?
    Thanks
    Anna :D

  4. oftheshore says:

    Hi there!
    What a great podcast, you’re doing an amazing job!
    I was just wondering if you are aware of another film version of Aladdin, which was made in the Soviet Union in 1967. It is best described as a mix of Disney’s Aladdin and Aladdin from the Arabian Nights. It’s a little odd, and some of the jokes are probably impossible to translate, but it’s an interesting watch, if you can find it. Budhur, the princess, is fun and flirty (as flirty as you could be in a children’s film made in the USSR, I guess?), and I liked the Mother’s character, too!
    Here’s an IMDB link for anyone who’s interested:
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0167482/
    There are ways to watch it if you can’t find the DVD, but not sure if subtitles are easily available.

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